Great Advice If You Are Filing For Personal Bankruptcy

Are you feeling stressed about all of your bills? Think that you might have to file for bankruptcy? Well, bankruptcy does not have to be an option for you. There are many things you can do to avoid going bankrupt. Do what is best for you and your family and read this article to figure out how to avoid bankruptcy.

Trying to exclude family members you owe money to before filing for personal bankruptcy can get you into serious hot water. The court will look into who you pay-off as far as a year back, and if they find you showing favor to family over other creditors, they could invalidate your filing completely.

Consider hiring an attorney who specializes in personal bankruptcy. Although most states allow you to file for bankruptcy without a lawyer, your case could be dismissed if you don’t fill out your paperwork correctly, and you may need to file additional motions to protect your property or discharge certain debts. A bankruptcy attorney can help ensure that you get the outcome you hope for when you file.

After your bankruptcy is finalized, you should begin re-building your credit by, obtaining copies of your credit reports. Your reports may show that you filed for bankruptcy, but it can take a lot of time for the credit bureaus to remove the original debt from your credit history. Check your reports over thoroughly, if there is debt showing that was discharged in a bankruptcy, you can contact the credit bureaus online, or in writing and request that the information be deleted.

Be aware that most bankruptcy lawyers will offer a free consultation. Take advantage of that and meet with several of them. If it’s handled in 15 minutes or less, if you meet with the assistant instead of the lawyer, or if you’re pressured to sign up immediately in person or by phone, go somewhere else.

Before meeting with a lawyer, start compiling all of the documentation and paperwork you will need to provide an accurate picture of your finances. Gather six months’ worth of pay stubs, bank statements, bills and credit card statements. Create a list of property and assets that you own. Having this entire information ready from the beginning can save you trouble when it’s time to file.

Become knowledgeable in regards to details about chapter seven bankruptcy vs. chapter 13 bankruptcy. Take the time to learn about them extensively, and then figure out which one will be best for your particular situation. Go to a specialized lawyer to ask your questions and get some useful advice on what to do.

Consider filing using chapter 13 bankruptcy. In most states, Chapter 13 bankruptcy law stipulates that you must have under $250,000 of unsecured debt and a steady income. This lets you keep any real estate and personal property while you repay all your debts through a consolidation program. That plan lasts approximately three to five years, and then you are discharged from unsecured debt. Consider that if you even miss one payment, your case will not be considered by the court.

Once you have an understanding of your options you can see that there are a lot of things that you can do to avoid bankruptcy. Hopefully, the contents of this article have helped guide you in the right direction. Start implementing the lessons that you have learned today, so that you do not have to stress over financial burdens again.